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My 22 Month Old Doesn't Talk Rss

My 22 Month old doesn't say a word ! He has his baby babble, and makes the noise 'ma' and 'da' when he calls out for me or his dad. We walked past a bird the other day and he said 'bir'

I know they all do things in their own time but should I be concerned at all ?!

He is unbelievably clever with everything else will go to the cupboard and pull out a cup when his thirsty, can point and identify every object in his books, can colour co-ordiate his blocks when building !

He is on level with everything else he should be doing by his age just not the talking. At the 18 month maternal nurse check up she said as long as he understands what we say, which he does, there isn't a problem.

He loves his kisses and cuddles, loves playing with other kids so I dont think anything is wrong but there is always that thing in the back of my head wondering why he isn't speaking yet.



I wouldn't try to worry too much some kids just don't speak as much as others as you said as long as he gets what your saying and his trying to talk I wouldn't worry smile
He sounds like a bright little boy to me.
I think from memory I maybe wrong here though sorry but I think my health nurse said that if they haven't made any progress in talking by 3 that they will look into a speech pathologist etc.
Your lil guy isn't quite 2 so I wouldn't be too worried yet smile
My son is the same age and he's talking heaps, mostly just one word sentences but a few two word sentences now. But his cousin who is 6 weeks younger is barely saying anything, he just grunts and points! smile





I dont want to worry you but slow speech development and early colour coordination CAN indicate low level autism.
In your situation I would see a gp to be sure.
Don't freak out from reading this. Im not an expert and there is every possibility your son is fine.
If it was me id like to catch it early if I could.

Good luck.




OOOHHH... INTERNET FIGHT. WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO? CAPS LOCK ME TOO DEATH?
(Noddy's not fat ffs!)

I wouldn't worry... all kids develop in different stages. I don't have advise but as I said, don't let it worry you just yet. He's still small smile My daughter is the same age and she says a lot of words but doesn't make sense and she doesn't speak clearly.
Ma, Da and Bir shows that he is able to speak and hear. So I wouldn't worry too much. My local nurse told me that the minimum for a 24 month old is 3 words spoken with meaning. If that isn't happening then to get expert help.

I suggest put a lot of work into helping him with simple sounds like copying shhhh, ssssss, brrrrr etc.
If he is given things by just pointing or making noises that will not encourage him to talk. Even if he just starts saying the name of the thing he wants !! This is especially so if an elder child anticipates what the younger one wants and obliges. My Mother had this problem with my brother and the Dr. alerted her to the fact. She was also told that boys tend to talk a little later than girls.The same thing occured with my 2 nieces. The youngest one just pointed and made a noise and her Mother would send the elder one to get the things. My great-niece "tried it on" with the staff at childcare. They knew she could talk if she wanted to so they told her to use her words.
I would certainly heed the advice re low level autism if he doesn't talking better soon because if there is a problem the sooner therapy is started if needed the better he will cope and adjust by the time he starts school. It may also eliminate other learning difficulties later such as reading and writing. A lady I know has a daughter who was just a bit late talking properly, now at school she is still having problems with reading and "mixes" the letters around when writing. The lady told the school she had concerns first year but the teacher said she was ok that she would catch up. THe next year after half the year was over, another teacher finally admitted that there is a problem and gave them a letter and the details of where to take her to be tested to see if it is a form of autism or dyslexia or what it really is before therapy and tutoring begins.

My daughter is about this age too and only has a handful of words and those words didn't come about until she started at preschool (the past 2-3mths) whereas my son had about 20 words by the time he was one, I was concerned too and the ped (I see one about her allergies) said she was just taking her time and there is NO problem if there is comprehension and boy does she understand what I'm saying (she just doesn't listen lol) Between the 2 I read to them and talked to them the same as they were babies and still natter along about what we are doing to encourage the words.. I don't agree with the 'making' them use their words, some kids jut won't, I know whenever I try she just screams the house down and starts throwing herself around...


I think its more just encouragement. Like gently saying "use your words please" or asking "please tell mummy what you need" more than refusing something or punishing them.




OOOHHH... INTERNET FIGHT. WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO? CAPS LOCK ME TOO DEATH?
(Noddy's not fat ffs!)

my daughter is currently 16months old and is in speech therapy for a birth defect thats twisting her jaw. They want a list of up to 50 words that she "tries" to say by 18months. I would definately see your GP and discuss your concern, if a professional says it's all good then great but none of us are qualified to give you an answer and you'll be left wondering. I'm sure it is nothing but always best to be sure not just guess

my daughter is currently 16months old and is in speech therapy for a birth defect thats twisting her jaw. They want a list of up to 50 words that she "tries" to say by 18months. I would definately see your GP and discuss your concern, if a professional says it's all good then great but none of us are qualified to give you an answer and you'll be left wondering. I'm sure it is nothing but always best to be sure not just guess


I agree my 2 yr old also is currently in speech therapy and by the time they are 2 I have been told that they are to have anywhere between 50 - 200 words of course not all will have 200
And if they only have 50 it is at the lower end and they do assess your child for speech
I also agree if you are concerned I would speak to a gp or health nurse
I completely understand toddlers develop differently with speech but agree with replyknowdammit have a speech therapist assess your child
They are really friendly and make you feel at ease and that it's quite common and you will be surprised how many toddlers / kids their is its just that parents don't talk about it I found
I thought I would be the only one

my daughter is currently 16months old and is in speech therapy for a birth defect thats twisting her jaw. They want a list of up to 50 words that she "tries" to say by 18months. I would definately see your GP and discuss your concern, if a professional says it's all good then great but none of us are qualified to give you an answer and you'll be left wondering. I'm sure it is nothing but always best to be sure not just guess

I've been told 30-50 words by 18 months too. Dds nearly 19 months and she has more than 50. My friends ds who is four days older has more. They are both clear enough that most people understand them straight away.
Thats not me bragging, im just explaining whats normal for my social group. The other three boys in my mothers group are at similar stages for their ages.
In my child development book the 18 month check up only has choice for 20,30,50 or more than 50 words.




OOOHHH... INTERNET FIGHT. WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO? CAPS LOCK ME TOO DEATH?
(Noddy's not fat ffs!)

I wouldn't worry yet either, DS spoke a few words before 2 but once he turned 2 his speech just sky rocketed and now at 27 months is speaking in sentances and picking up new words all the time. His friends the same age have varing levels of speech too. My mum said my brother didn't speak much till 3. I would wait a few months and then get it checked. If he is understanding what you are saying that's as important as speaking



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