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Teaching the alphabet. Lock Rss

OK got to the other computer

Tracing Worksheets

There's lots of tracing worksheets but if you scroll down you'll find the name ones <span class="emoticon smile">smile</span>

I wouldn't be too stressed about it

They learn it at kindy and school as other have pointed out. I had no success teaching my kids to recognise the alphabet other than recognise the first letter in their names before kindy.

At their school they teach the alphabet using the jolly phonics program which I love and both my kids are picking up the letters so easily now.

Jolly Phonics teaches the letters of the alphabet using a little singing ditty (for those kids that learn through sound), a picture (for those kids who learn visually) and with an action (for those kids who learn by doing). For instance the letter 'a' is taught with a picture of an ant on an arm. And the kids sing 'ants on my arm. ants on my arm. the letter a sounds like a, a, a. ants on my arm' ... and they run their fingers up their arm while singing it.

There are lots of similar programs out there. Perhaps check with the school your child is going to and see what program they use and try and get hold of it??

Most importantly I would keep it fun as this is the best way for kids to learn at this age! Good Luck

She is in kindy this year, I was just thinking about trying to help her along at home, as alot of the kids in the class are writing there names and she is a little upset she can't.



If this is the case definitely ask the kindy teacher for a stencil.

In DS1's class this year the teachers are having to go back over all the kids names and 're-teach' them to write their names so the letters are written correctly.
Is your DD interested in learning letters or how to write her name? This is the biggest factor IMO.

Here are some things that may help (IMO)...


Environmental print- reading signs, looking at catalogues, a cereal box, tin can etc. Talking about what you see around you is a great incidental way of teaching letters and symbols. Walks around the street , home or looking at some junk mail (toy catalogues are great) is all it takes to go letter spotting.



With writing....Start with letters in DD's name if that is the direction you want to go (if your goal is DD being able to recognise and then write her name). Point the capital letter out in books, on tv, wherever you see it. For example, my DD3 (aged 3) is Hannah, we have pointed out the capital H to her in books etc and now whenever she sees a H she says "Oh, look a H like in my name". She recognises the letter that starts her name.

For learning your name, having it as a sight word can be handy too, you could make your own flashcard of DD's name and place it with a photo of her. A child being able to pick what their name 'looks' like can help with pre-writing and early writing skills as they learn the 'shape' of their name.

Writing letters doesn't have to be confined to paper either, try writing in the sand with a finger, in fingerpaint, in a tray full of flour, make letter shapes with playdough...lots of different ways to write that can be fun.


Tracing sheets can help as you progess, especially helping with the proper formation of letters and the way in which they are written (starting point of letter, direction of pencil to form letter etc). Tracing sheets also help with sizing of letters and honing fine motor control.

I also agree that schooling will 'teach' your DD more formally through the use of phonics/reading/writing programs and activities that reinforce that learning.

Is your DD interested in learning letters or how to write her name? This is the biggest factor IMO.

Here are some things that may help (IMO)...


Environmental print- reading signs, looking at catalogues, a cereal box, tin can etc. Talking about what you see around you is a great incidental way of teaching letters and symbols. Walks around the street , home or looking at some junk mail (toy catalogues are great) is all it takes to go letter spotting.



With writing....Start with letters in DD's name if that is the direction you want to go (if your goal is DD being able to recognise and then write her name). Point the capital letter out in books, on tv, wherever you see it. For example, my DD3 (aged 3) is Hannah, we have pointed out the capital H to her in books etc and now whenever she sees a H she says "Oh, look a H like in my name". She recognises the letter that starts her name.

For learning your name, having it as a sight word can be handy too, you could make your own flashcard of DD's name and place it with a photo of her. A child being able to pick what their name 'looks' like can help with pre-writing and early writing skills as they learn the 'shape' of their name.

Writing letters doesn't have to be confined to paper either, try writing in the sand with a finger, in fingerpaint, in a tray full of flour, make letter shapes with playdough...lots of different ways to write that can be fun.


Tracing sheets can help as you progess, especially helping with the proper formation of letters and the way in which they are written (starting point of letter, direction of pencil to form letter etc). Tracing sheets also help with sizing of letters and honing fine motor control.

I also agree that schooling will 'teach' your DD more formally through the use of phonics/reading/writing programs and activities that reinforce that learning.



I agree with all that Dee has written. I think they key is to make the learning meaningful, relating letters to you child's name, siblings names, favourite animal, things in everyday life that they care about etc

Thanks everyone!!

The reading eggs site is great I signed up for the trial and she had a go straight away she was pretty proud of herself!!

She does write some letters out but doesn't know what they are, she can recognise her name, everytime she sees an I she thinks it's her name lol

She does want to learn it she gets so fustrated when she doesn't get it or can't do things related to the alphabet, I'll just make a daily activity out of it and go from there.

OK got to the other computer

Tracing Worksheets

There's lots of tracing worksheets but if you scroll down you'll find the name ones <span class="emoticon smile">smile</span>



Thanks for the site, it's great, I've been doing my own, but this will be heaps easier. Have already added it to my favourites.

My DD is 4 and I am having trouble teaching her the letters in the alphabet, she knows how to sing it but can only recognise 3 or 4 letters from it.

Does anyone have any advise on how to teach her??

we use those foam letters in the bathtub. I'll hold one up and say a word , or a family members name that begins with it. I've sort of done it all along-

we also are in the process of making a book together, where I've put a big letter (eg G ), and put 3 pics underneath, grandma, green, girl .

That, and everything Dee said. we go over coles catalogues (and even at Coles we talk about numbers- the price tags are in pretty big print)- it all sinks in.

good luck
my son is almost 4 and I'm getting him prepared for kindy. there is a great website called starfall that teaches the alphabets in a fun and interactive manner. i advice every mum to sit with her kid and check the website out.
i reckon its great. it also teaches kids shapes, colours and how to read. you can also print traceables which are great.

http://www.starfall.com


good luck and hope it helps.
my ds has just got a leap pad toy for his 3rd birthday it has all the letter keys on it and a little screen with a pen the screen lights up and they use the pen to trace the lights to write the letter/shape. DS and DD(20 months) both love the "computer" and writing their letters.

they are $30 from kmart if ur interested.

try the fisher price website. it has good alphabet and number 'games' as well as activities for colours, shapes and printable stuff.

Lauren 3/5/2007

As a Kindergarten teacher I say don't worry about it. By all means do lots of reading to her, point things out and play games, but don't make it stressful for her. She will learn all of this at school. These days there is so much pressure on parents to have their children 'ready for school' and end up teaching their children before they are ready. Good luck
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