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  5. What happens when your waters break

What happens when your waters break Rss

A friends waters broke last night but she hasnt gone into labour yet? They have given her until this afternoon to try and get into labour herself or they will induce her tonight.

Bubs is posterior so im not sure if that has anything to do with it?

I just thought your waters break and you start labour?
Not always. My cousins waters broke before she went into labour, but she didnt know that until the doctor went to rupture the membranes to induce her, only to discover they were already broken (not sure how she didn't notice).
The baby ended up having an infection as a result of this and was sent to the Royal Childrens Hospital for a few days!
it has something to do with infection getting into the baby once that membrane has ruptured. since that protective barrier is effectively down they wont let you stay that way for long and will induce to prevent infection to the baby or mum. (please anyone correct me if im wrong ) smile

it has something to do with infection getting into the baby once that membrane has ruptured. since that protective barrier is effectively down they wont let you stay that way for long and will induce to prevent infection to the baby or mum. (please anyone correct me if im wrong ) smile


Thats what i thought, cos i remember in our anntenatal (sp) classes the widwife said to come straight to the hospital if they break because you can get infection?

Thats what i thought, cos i remember in our anntenatal (sp) classes the widwife said to come straight to the hospital if they break because you can get infection?

thats where we had it told to us too, at our antinatal class with our first bub, havnt had it happen myself tho.

it has something to do with infection getting into the baby once that membrane has ruptured. since that protective barrier is effectively down they wont let you stay that way for long and will induce to prevent infection to the baby or mum. (please anyone correct me if im wrong ) smile


This policy has always confused me. So if your waters break at 24 weeks they do everything in their power to ensure you DON'T go into labour and baby stays put, but if you are at term you only have 24 hours?? blink Surely the chance/risk of infection is the same at 24 weeks or 30 weeks or 40 weeks? unsure I understand that prematurity is probably seen as a bigger risk than infection but it still makes no sense to me.

This is just a general observation btw, not necessarily aimed at anyone in particular.



This policy has always confused me. So if your waters break at 24 weeks they do everything in their power to ensure you DON'T go into labour and baby stays put, but if you are at term you only have 24 hours?? blink Surely the chance/risk of infection is the same at 24 weeks or 30 weeks or 40 weeks? unsure I understand that prematurity is probably seen as a bigger risk than infection but it still makes no sense to me.

This is just a general observation btw, not necessarily aimed at anyone in particular.


Thats why im confused, she is at home bouncing away on her fit ball and doing anything she can to bring on labour.. An infection is a infection it can happen at anytime! Im not even sure if she has been seen by a doctor or widwife.

Im just glad its not me otherwise id would be sitting in the hospital kicking up a fuss until i was admitted!
I watched a program on this not long ago about prem labour, if your waters break early on say your 24th week the risk of infection is out weighed by the survival of the baby outside the womb sort thing so they will keep a mother under constant monitor for infection and try and keep bub in as long as possible. A infection can kill a baby and the mother and can also lead to the mother having a hysterectomy due to the a infection getting severe.
So I totally understand why they would want her to come in soon with her waters broken as why let a mum and bub have a risk of infection and complications when it can be prevented.
I wish your friend the best and hope she delivers bub soon smile

This policy has always confused me. So if your waters break at 24 weeks they do everything in their power to ensure you DON'T go into labour and baby stays put, but if you are at term you only have 24 hours?? blink Surely the chance/risk of infection is the same at 24 weeks or 30 weeks or 40 weeks? unsure I understand that prematurity is probably seen as a bigger risk than infection but it still makes no sense to me.

This is just a general observation btw, not necessarily aimed at anyone in particular.




Thats why im confused, she is at home bouncing away on her fit ball and doing anything she can to bring on labour.. An infection is a infection it can happen at anytime! Im not even sure if she has been seen by a doctor or widwife.

Im just glad its not me otherwise id would be sitting in the hospital kicking up a fuss until i was admitted!


this has confused me too and i remember someone asking about it at our antinatal class but i wasnt paying 100% attention at the time (i think i may have been playing with th forceps at the time lol)


I watched a program on this not long ago about prem labour, if your waters break early on say your 24th week the risk of infection is out weighed by the survival of the baby outside the womb sort thing so they will keep a mother under constant monitor for infection and try and keep bub in as long as possible. A infection can kill a baby and the mother and can also lead to the mother having a hysterectomy due to the a infection getting severe.
So I totally understand why they would want her to come in soon with her waters broken as why let a mum and bub have a risk of infection and complications when it can be prevented.
I wish your friend the best and hope she delivers bub soon smile

i guess this makes sense when they have to weigh up the risks for a prem bub rather then an at term bub.. but all in all IMO once your at full term unless there is actual distress to the baby i think sometimes they do way to much to interfer with the birth process.

This policy has always confused me. So if your waters break at 24 weeks they do everything in their power to ensure you DON'T go into labour and baby stays put, but if you are at term you only have 24 hours?? blink Surely the chance/risk of infection is the same at 24 weeks or 30 weeks or 40 weeks? unsure I understand that prematurity is probably seen as a bigger risk than infection but it still makes no sense to me.

This is just a general observation btw, not necessarily aimed at anyone in particular.


It will be a risk assessment. I imagine the risk of infection doesn't change, but the risk of the alternative (the baby being born) changes dramatically. At 24 weeks a baby has very high risk of harm, compared with a baby at 40 weeks having very low risk of harm.
My waters broke at 35 weeks & i went to the hossy for assessment. As i was not in labour i was sent home. i was told that if labor hadnt started within the magical 24 hours, to come into the hospital - infection risk, etc etc
It didnt start & i went to the hospital - as my baby was not considered 'full term' i was monitored extremely closely, hooked up to IV antibiotics (just in case). They wanted to get me to 36 weeks before inducing if they could. They got me to 36 weeks - i wasnt allowed home during that time obviously & was then given the syntocin (?? i think that's what its called) drip & it was all on its way after that.

I also vaguely remember something about the membranes being able to repair themselves early on in the preg, but not late, as they are too stretched & tight?? something like that was discussed during my stay in hospital, but it was nearly 13 years ago, so the details could be a little sketchy.
Well she has had her baby and she is all healthy and is doing well she was born a tiny 6 pound after 3 hours of being induced!
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