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cutting cord Rss

hi all this will prob sound odd to some but i dont want the cord cut until ive delivered the placenta..i told this to my MW at my last clinic and she just looked at me like i was an idiot and said 'um..why?'
what are others feelings/ opinions on this? and what rights do i have in regards to this matter?

i know medically there is no reason to leave the cord intact as once bub takes the first breath their system is fully functional (in normal conditions) but for me its more of a spiritual thing..i just feel that i dont want that life connection that ive had with my baby severed before my body finishes the job (so to speak smile )

I think if you want to and if it's your belief then you have every right to do it. My midwife always asks my beliefs are in regards to any decisions we make. I find it weird how your reacted! Your midwife is supposed to be one of your main supporters..

i dont think she was being un supportive and she certainly didnt say i couldnt ask for this to happen but she acted like i was odd lol like shes never been asked this before..my MW atm are actually really good im just curious about others feelings about cord cutting smile
I think you have every right to request it, as you said there is no medical reason as to why you should and there is also no medical reason why you cant (as far as i know)..

I think the midwife should respect your wishes and comply no matter how strange it seems.

PS i never thought of it like that but now i think about it i can understand it.

I hope it all works out for you. smile

Mum of 3 girls, 1 boy, 1 angel, 1 on the way!

This is a really good article on the benefits of delayed clamping
i mean oviously if there IS a medical reason to cut..like bubs got issues and needs attention then of corse did expect them to cut it to take bub where they need to, but if alls well and i can just snuggle bub then i dont see the need to sever the connection until ive delivered smile
[quote name='gypsy kylz' date='12 September 2011 - 10:53 AM' timestamp='1315796009' post='3058365']
i dont think she was being un supportive and she certainly didnt say i couldnt ask for this to happen but she acted like i was odd lol like shes never been asked this before..my MW atm are actually really good im just curious about others feelings about cord cutting <span class="emoticon smile">smile</span>[/quote]
As a midwife, shouldn't she of all people [i]know[/i] the benefits of delayed clamping? [url=http://www.mysmiley.net/free-happy-smileys.php]...]

This is a really good article on the benefits of delayed clamping

well there you go <span class="emoticon smile">smile</span> maybe there is a valid medical reason (or several) to delaying cutting the cord. i think ill just put my foot down and make sure hubbys aware that thats what i want so it doesnt get forgotten <span class="emoticon smile">smile</span> cheers ruby gloom X
i would like to have the opition but i have short cords and after pushing them out the cord needs cutting so i can snuggle lol
"Delayed" cord clamping has benefits for baby so personally I'd be telling the midwife where to shove it. laugh In terms of your rights...you have the right to consent to, or refuse, any treatment for you and baby so if you want to wait for the cord to be clamped then your wishes should be respected and if they aren't then a complaint should be made. We didn't clamp DS2s cord until it had stopped pulsing, which took about 8 minutes from memory. Babies cords who are being clamped immediately after birth can deprive them of up to 200ml of blood which might not sound like much but to put it in adult terms, it's the equivalent of removing one third of an adults total blood supply, which is classed as a severe haemorrhage. The benefits of 'delayed' cord clamping that we know about are: [list] [item] Increased levels of iron [/item][item] Lower risk of anaemia [/item][item] Fewer transfusions, and [/item][item] Fewer incidences of intraventricular haemorrhage. [/item][/list] In short babies who have clamping delayed have on average 32% more blood volume than those in the immediate clamping camp and delaying clamping by 2 minutes increased iron reserves between 27-47 mg, which is equivalent to 1-2 months supply of iron. IMO there is no 'harm' to waiting so I don't see the issue in not waiting if that is what parents want to happen even if the health professionals insist there are no benefits or seem confused or curious about the choice. [quote name='sherimumof3' date='12 September 2011 - 03:11 PM' timestamp='1315797067' post='3058383'] i would like to have the opition but i have short cords and after pushing them out the cord needs cutting so i can snuggle lol [/quote] DS2 had a short cord, probably due to an anterior placenta, but I still snuggled him while waiting for the cord to stop pulsing.



i mean oviously if there IS a medical reason to cut..like bubs got issues and needs attention then of corse did expect them to cut it to take bub where they need to, but if alls well and i can just snuggle bub then i dont see the need to sever the connection until ive delivered smile


Hi, just a thought to consider...I understand the spiritual nature of your request but in my situation it would not have been possible. Both of my boys have been born with very short cords, that is they would not reach to my stomach whilst the cord was intact. It can take up to half an hour to deliver the placenta...when I gave birth I wanted my baby NOW! I don't think it would have been fair on my son's or practical in a medical sense to delay cutting the cord. Just something to consider should this happen to you.
Why do they rush to cut the cords?

Why do they rush to cut the cords?


to keep it all moving along.

I think its bad medical practice to cut it before its stopped pulsating. tell them they are not to cut it until YOU are ready. Or tell them you want a lotus birth. wink

but I would definately print out some "medical" info and give it to your midwife. I hate it that hospital midwives have no idea about traditional midwifery.
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